Shakespearean Prompt-Books
Shakespearean prompt-books of the seventeenth century, vol. 8 (The Winter's Tale) [a machine-readable transcription] Shakespeare, William Creation of machine-readable version: Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Creation of digital images: Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Conversion to TEI.2-conformant markup: University of Virginia Library Electronic Text Center. 25 kilobytes University of Virginia Library. Charlottesville, Va. Bibliographic Society, Sha8WTP

Publicly-accessible

URL: http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/bsuva/promptbook/

1997

Shakespearean prompt-books of the seventeenth century

Shakespearean prompt-books of the seventeenth century, vol. 8 William Shakespeare Editor G. Blakemore Evans

Issued in portfolios. The prompt-books are reproduced in collotype facsimile.

Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 1996 Print copy consulted: First Edition provided by the BSUVA

Shakespearean prompt-books of the seventeenth century

Prepared for the University of Virginia Library Electronic Text Center.

All quotation marks retained as data.

All unambiguous end-of-line hyphens have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.

The images exist as archived TIFF images, one or more JPEG versions for general use, and thumbnail GIFs.

Keywords in the header are a local Electronic Text Center scheme to aid in establishing analytical groupings.

Library of Congress Subject Headings 1960-1996 English drama; prose LCSH 24-bit color; 400 dpi July 1997 corrector Catherine Tousignant, Electronic Text Center
  • Corrected transcriptional errors.
  • May 1997 corrector Michele Ierardi, Electronic Text Center
  • Added TEI header
  • Image of the spine: Shakespearean Prompt-Books, Vol. VIII

    Image of the cover, part 1: Shakespearean Prompt-Books, Vol. VIII: Ki! Henry VIII,
       The Merry Wives of Windsor, Twelth Night, The Comedy of Errors, The Winter's Tale

    Image of the titlepage, part 1: Shakespearean Prompt-Books, Vol. VIII: King Lear,
       Henry VIII, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Twelth Night, The Comedy of Errors, The Winter's Tale

    SHAKESPEAREAN
    PROMPT-BOOKS
    of the
    SEVENTEENTH CENTURY Vol. VIII
    King Lear, Henry VIII,
    The Merry Wives of Windsor
    Twelfth Night, The Comedy of Errors
    The Winter's Tale Edited by
    G. Blakemore Evans A Publication of
    The Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia Charlottesville 1996

    Smock Alley
    The Winter s Tale
    Third Folio
    Introduction

    THE Smock Alley Winter's Tale prompt-book (PB) is not, strictly considered, a prompt-book but a preliminary (and probably incomplete) cutting of the play, similar in this respect to the Padua Winter's Tale.[1] The method of cutting is noticeably like that in the Smock Alley King Lear PB, where it is associated with Hand II, who, as here, cuts by circling lines, phrases, and single words. Aside from the various cuts, no other prompt notations occur.

    There is no record of any performance of The Winter's Tale during the Restoration, and the play was not produced in the eighteenth century until 1741-42 (fourteen performances). No further performances are recorded until 1754, at which time and in the years following the original play was replaced by three much shortened adaptations dealing primarily with the pastoral elements in Acts IV-V: The Sheep-Shearing: Or, Florizel and Perdita (1755), by MacNamara Morgan; Florizel and Perdita, A Dramatic Pastoral (1756), by David Garrick; The Sheep Shearing (1777), by George Colman. These and a somewhat shortened version of the original by Thomas Hull (1771) held the boards for the remainder of the eighteenth century.[2] A second version of the original was produced by John Philip Kemble at Drury Lane in 1802.[3] Both Hull's and Kemble's acting texts have been compared with the Smock Alley promptbook; also compared are the Padua Winter's Tale PB and the so-called Collier MS.

    1. See Vol. II: Part i, of this series, pp. 21-29.

    2. See C. B. Hogan, Shakespeare in the Theatre, 1701-1800, II (1957), 674-698. Hogan indicates the principal cuts in Morgan, Garrick, Hull, and Colman, pp. 674-676. Hull's acting version was first published in John Bell's Shakespeare's Plays, As they are now performed at the Theatres Royal in London, Vol. V, 1773.

    3. The edition of Kemble's acting version here used was published in Mrs. Inchbald's British Theatre, Vol. III, 1808.

    Collations
    The Winter's Tale

    Image of page 277 of The Winter's Tale prompt-book (I.i.1-I.ii.43).

    THE following collation is arranged under a single category: Textual cuts. The act, scene, line numbering is that of the Globe text (1911 ed.). Angle brackets are used to indicate letters (or words) illegible or shaved in binding. Abbreviations employed are as follows:

    • Collier MS . . . . . . . . the Collier-Perkins Second Folio (1632), in the Huntington Library
    • F . . . . . . . . . . . here used for Third Folio (1663/64)
    • Ff . . . . indicates substantial agreement of all four Folio texts of The Winter's Tale
    • Hull . . . Thomas Hull's acting version of The Winter's Tale as performed at Covent Garden, in Bell's Shakespeare's Plays, Vol. V (1773)
    • Kemble . . . . . . . . . J. P. Kemble's acting version of The Winter's Tale as performed at Drury Lane, in Mrs. Inchbald's British Theatre, Vol. III (1808)
    • Padua PB . . . . . . . .the cutting of The Winter's Tale, in the University of Padua's copy of the First Folio (1623)
    • PB Smock Alley, The Winter's Tale prompt book

    Textual cuts

    All cuts are made by circling the lines to be deleted, such circling only noted in the Collations when there is some irregularity. Where a "massed entry" at the beginning of a scene occurs, no attempt was made to adjust it or mark the entry of characters who actually enter later in the scene.

    I.ii

    12-14 that may . . . truly] So Hull, Kemble. 24-25 which to . . . me;] Hull cuts 24-27 ('which . . . brother.'); Kemble cuts 23-27 ('My affairs . . . brother.'). 37 Wee'1 thwack . . . Distaffes.] Hull cuts 28-29 ('I had . . . stay:'), 34-39 ('. . . week.'). 80 Grace to Boot:] Circled and crossed through (Hull cuts 71-86 ['had we . . . us.']; Kemble cuts 84-86 ['. . . us.']). 105 'Tis grace indeed.] So Hull, Kemble. 120-129 Leo. I fecks: . . . me: yet] Hull cuts 119-146 ('Mamillius, . . . Browes'); Kemble cuts 132 ('As o're dy'd Blacks,'), 132-134 ('false . . . mine;'), 138-146 ('. . . Browes)'); Collier MS cuts 123-125 ('. . . Neat!'), 138-146 ('. . . Browes)'). 133-134 by one . . . mine;] See 120-129. 135-146 Come (Sir. . . Browes)] See 120-129. 195-198 by Sir . . . will.] Hull cuts 190-209 ('There . . . there?'); Kemble cuts 194-198 ('been . . . will:'), 203-206 ('be it . . . baggage:'); Collier MS cuts 195-198 ('And his . . . will.'), 203-207 ('From East . . . not.'). 200-206 Physick for's . . . baggage:] Only 'Physick . . . none:' may have been circled originally; see 195-198. 252-254 But that . . . Lord.)] Padua PB cuts 235-284 ('. . . true.'); Hull cuts 238-239 (I . . . reform'd:'), 242 ('To bide upon't:'), 243 ('If . . . way,'), 244-245 ('. . . requir'd:'), 250-254, 266-267 ('. . . mine.'), 268-271 ('. . . mute)', 271 ('for. . .')-272, 275 ('then . . .')-278, 283-284 ('. . . true.'); Kemble cuts 249-254 ('My . . . forth'), 260-261 ('. . . non-performance;'), 268-269 ('or. . . Horn'); Collier MS cuts 253-254 ('. . . forth'). 260-261 Whereof . . . non-performance;] See 252-254. 268-272 you have . . . think)] See 252-254. 288 horsing foot on foot?] So Hull, Kemble. 291 with the pin and web,] Retained, Padua PB, Hull, Kemble, Collier MS. 314 Have bench'd, and] Kemble cuts 313-314 ('whom . . . worship,'). 323-324 (So Soveraignly. . . thee.] Padua PB cuts 318-341 ('Cam. Sir . . . none.'); Hull cuts 323-324 ('So . . . rot;'); retained Kemble and Collier MS, the first giving 'I have lov'd thee.' to Leontes and reading 'I've loved thee, - ' (after Theobald). 333 Could man so blench?] Padua PB cuts 318-341 ('Cam. Sir . . . none.'); Hull cuts 332-333 ('Would . . . blench?'). 378-380 Be intelligent. . . not.] So Hull; Kemble cuts 377-384 ('do . . . with't.'). 390 Camillo,] See 391-394. 391 certainly] See 391-394. 391-394 there to / Clerk-like . . . gentle:] Hull cuts 382-397 ('for . . . concealment.'); Kemble cuts 391-394 ( . . . gentle: )

    II.i

    9-11 so that. . . Pen.] Hull, Kemble substitute 'so they be / In a semicircle cut,'. 38-45 Alack, for . . . Spider.] Kemble cuts 39 ('There . . .')-46. 71-74 (these Petty-brands . . . Ha's,] Hull cuts 60-64 ('. . . Nayward.'), 67-76 ('Honourable . . . honest:'); Kemble cuts 60 ('and let . . ')-64 but retains 71-74, reading 'pretty brands' for F 'Petty-brands'. 82-87 O, thou . . . Beggar:] So Hull, but Gentleman (in Bell) says these lines and 89-94 ('and . . . Titles;') should be retained; Kemble retains 82-87. 92 But with . . . Principal;] Hull cuts 89-94 ('and . . . Titles;'); Kemble cuts 92 ('But . . . Principal;'), 93-94 ('even . . . Titles;'). 93 A Bed-swarver.] See 92. 135-136 Ile go. . . her:] Hull cuts 133-139 ('If . . . be.'), 139 ('Lord. Good my Lord.'), 143-157 ('. . . dungy earth.'); Kemble cuts 131-139 ('. . . be.'), 139 ('Lord. Good my Lord.'), 142-143 ('would . . . honor-flaw'd,'), 147 ('Ire geld 'em all:'), 148-150 ('they . . . issue.'), 161 (Leo. Why . . .')-172; Collier MS cuts 153-154 ('. . . feel.'). 162-163 but rather . . . instigation?] See 135-136. 176-179 (Which was . . . deed)] Hull cuts 162-174 ('but . . . fool:'), 177-179 ('. . . deed)'), 181-182 ('. . . wild'), 191 ('such; . . .')-199; Kemble cuts 161 'Leo. Why . . .')-167, 177-179 ('. . . deed)'), 182 ('in post,'), 197-199 (replaced by 168-172 [. . . overture.']).

    II.ii

    33-35 If I . . . more:] Kemble cuts 34-35 ('. . . more:').

    II.iii

    20-22 in himself . . . serve.] Line 21 omitted in Ff 2-4; Hull cuts 18-23 ('Fie, . . . her:'), and, as in Collier MS, omits III.1; Kemble cuts 17 ('Leave . . .')-18, substituting 'Polixenes, thou Fie! no more of him;', and interpolating III.i before II.iii.

    III.ii

    l62-l66 which had . . . done:] Hull cuts 164-171 ('though . . . Honour:'); Kemble inserts 147-148 ('the Heavens . . . Injustice.') after 151 and begins a new scene with 154 ('Apollo pardon . . .'), inserting 'Break up the court.', to explain the new scene-break, as the second half of the original 154. 182-183 Fancies too . . . Nine)] So Hull, Kemble; Hull also cuts 177-178 ('What flaying? . . . Oyles?'), 184-200 ('stark-mad: . . . last:'); Kemble also cuts 177-178 (as in Hull), 186-200 ('. . . last:').

    IV.iv

    58-62 now here . . . sip.] Hull cuts 60-62 ('her . . . sip.'), 65-66 ('for . . . known.'); Kemble omits IV.i and here cuts 58-62 ('. . . sip.'). 99-103 Ile not . . . me.] 99-102 ('Ire . . . well:) first circled, then 102-103 ('and . . . me.'). Hull cuts 84-103 ('and . . . me.'); Kemble inserts 160-161 ('Good . . . Cream.') between 72 and 73 and cuts 74 ('these . . .')-75, 79 ('Sir . . . ')-108. 353-355 O Father . . . much.] Hull cuts 331-353 ('Ser. Master . . . hereafter:'); Kemble cuts 331-352, 354-355 ('. . . much.'), 356-357 ('. . . feasting.'), 358 ('And handed love, as you do;'), 362-366 ('If . . . know'). 442 Farre than . . . words)] Only 'Farre . . . off:' may have been originally circled. Hull cuts 441-442, 446-448 ('. . . thee.'); Kemble cuts 441 ('no . . .') 442, 443-445 ('Thou . . . it:'), 446-448 ('. . . thee.'), 450, and inserts 'Camillo, come. - ' after 'Court.' in 443 and 'Follow, sir. - ' after 'to't' in 452.

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